• Said intake photo January, 2012.

Said

Said (pronounced say-eed) is another one of our children who tends to go unnoticed until you’ve been at Tumaini for a little longer.  Like many of the older boys, he prefers to wait until he knows what kind of person you are before he makes himself known to you… when he does, he will suddenly be around a lot more often!  Said is a ‘cool guy’ and loves fist bumps and pretending that he doesn’t want a hug or to sit near you, even though he’s a very loving guy!

Story of Said

DOB – October 29, 2003

Came under Tumaini Care January, 2012 – Dada Amy of the UK is helping to support Said!

Said is a very smart boy and does quite well in school. He is the only member of his family to speak English and this will give him an enormous advantage over other children from his village with respect to him performing at school in the future.  He’s not afraid to ask for help and even when he gets frustrated, he takes a break and then comes back to it.  Quite the jokester, he’ll often tell you something silly just to see if you believe him.  Said loves to read and ride his bike, and, as one of the leaders of Simba house, he is a mature, responsible young man.

Said is an exception at Tumaini.  He has both a baba (dad) and mama who come from a small village called Majengo, near the Kilimanjaro airport.  Rashid and Neema K. come from the same village.

Said’s father is the village chair and works tirelessly to help improve his village.  He is a good man and Said’s mother is kind, gentle and loving, although both are desperately poor and lack the funds to send their children to a good school.  The school in the village has more than four hundred children and only three teachers who are regularly absent from their classrooms.  The children of the village do not have a chance at success and so we brought Said to Tumaini in thanks to the hard work his parents do.  It is Said’s parents who made us aware of the dire living conditions of Rashid and Neema K. and had we not brought them under our care when we did, I fear where we might find them today.

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